It has become clear to me, (and possibly to you), that I would rather knit than write about it, but then at the same time, I love talking about fiber craft because it is something I love to do, and it is also something I feel like I really understand.  I have a friend who is an architect and she can explain how a building is built based on looking at the outside.  I find that amazing, and it makes me proud to think that I can do the same thing with a knitted object.  I've been reading a lot of Elizabeth Zimmerman (knitting sage) and she has a blanket pattern where she intentionally goes out of her way to make it a puzzle for other knitters to understand how it was assembled.  I find this idea delightful for the same reason I like cast-offs that look like cast-ons and seamless construction.
Speaking of Elizabeth Zimmerman, I finally got a chance to try out one of her most iconic designs, the Baby Surprise Jacket.  The surprise is all for the knitter because the whole jacket it knit in one flat, misshapen piece and then with two seams at the tops of the arms, it becomes a jacket.  My cousin and his wife had a beautiful baby girl at the beginning of the year and I was so pleased to make this for her.
I wanted to do a whole outfit, and so I found this free cute little hat pattern on Ravelry.
And since her name is Iris, I found a free Lion Brand pattern for an Iris and sized it down using smaller yarn and a smaller crochet hook.
For my mom's birthday, I knew I wanted to make a pair of socks, and I wanted to make some that would fit.  She wanted some more subdued socks she could wear to work, which isn't usually the direction I go in for her.  She loves the Skew pattern from Knitty, and after an abortive attempt with another pattern that came out looking like a Viking boot, I adapted the Skew pattern with eyelets so that the skew is still visible, but without using self striping yarn. 
It is great to make things that people have asked for.  My brother in law requested a knit necktie, which sounded like a fun challenge.  I lined the skinny part by the neck with a piece of grosgrain ribbon.  Knitting a long skinny strip of moss stitch takes a lot longer than you would think. This is a modified free Lion Brand pattern.
I love Kate Davies' designs.  Her photography is beautiful and her designs are historic and modern at the same time.  I bought her book, and the design that captivated me immediately was the Puffin Sweater.  Did you know Puffins live in Scotland?  I didn't, and I love this fact.  
This was a quick anniversary gift for my husband.  He loves the TV show Adventure Time and this is a character, Jake the Dog, from that show.  I had to do it all at work and sneak the car at one point to go buy the yarn, so all of that is more exciting than the actual project, which was fairly simple.  The eyes are regular craft eyes you can buy at the store and then I used whiteout to color in Jake's distinctive pupils.  The pattern is on Ravelry.
This summer for the most part I've been working on Wedding Blankets.  We have so many dear friends that are getting married and we don't have the wherewithal to get to most of the weddings.  Only one of the weddings has happened so far, so I'll only post one of the blankets.  The pattern is one I bought from Bernat and is worked from the center and I used a slightly obscure Elizabeth Zimmerman cast-off from The Knitters Almanac around the edge with a variegated yarn.
When we were having colder weather, and before I got moving on these wedding blankets, I was slaving away on this monster, a dream sweater for my husband from an out of print Dale of Norway book.  I love it and I can't wait to start working on it again in the fall.
 
I spent the weekend attempting to give order to my massive yarn collection (more on this and what I found later.)  Of course, the main thing I found was that I have a lot of yarn that I can’t really imagine using.  That isn’t to say that I can’t imagine needing this yarn for something, but just looking at it isn’t an inspirational activity.  My husband thought it looked warm and fuzzy all laid out on the floor.  To me it looked like waist deep mud that I would have to wade through for some kind of craft basic training.  It’s back in tubs now, labeled into general categories: “acrylic worsted” and “natural worsted,” for example.  

I also found some “science experiment” knitting poking around, little swatches and tests.  One that’s been around for a year is the answer to the question “What if I made this bigger?”

I thought I was going to make a thread bedspread at some point, which, still might happen in my lifetime.  Of course, the pattern I chose was time consuming and thread consuming, and even popped up as the subject of some justified mockery on a well known knitting blog.   
Picture
Here's a block
I would need to make a gazillion, and I’ve made around 10.  Also, I can only imagine that this bedspread, once completed, would probably weigh so much that people laying beneath it could not move.  

At some point, I wanted to see what would happen if this fiddly little square was done in worsted? 
Again, the result eats up a lot of yarn, the brown part used almost a whole skein, but I love the effect.  Looking at all my acrylic worsted weight yarn, I’ve been thinking, I should finish this project. It seems like a great way to get rid of yarn and end up with a lacy extravagant blanket.  I was thinking maybe 9 squares, maybe 12.  I’m going to shoot for one a month and see where that gets me.   Though I just realized I have no idea what size hook I used for the big one.  Hmm.